My Favorite: Seesaw!

Finally! Starting week one of the #MTBoS Blogging Initiative, “My Favorite”!  You should definitely check it out if you would like some blogging inspiration!  It is only four posts and it’s not too late to join in!screen-shot-2017-01-06-at-7-44-01-pm

For my favorite, I wanted to share SeeSaw SeeSaw is an app that allows students to upload videos/pictures/drawings/links to a class page.  Students can share these with other students or onto their individual file.

I have used Seesaw as a teacher and as a coach.

screen-shot-2017-01-06-at-7-39-19-pmIt is really easy for students to join. They have to download the app and sign in as a student. There is no log-in required (they can for multiple classes) and they just have to scan a QR code to join.

I have used SeeSaw for reviews in class. Every student received a problem that was on the review.  They were to become an “expert” on that one problem. Once they were experts, they made a video of themselves explaining the problem. This was great. Students were explaining problems in their own words which required them to really think about the problem. Once they finished, they uploaded their video to Seesaw for the entire class to see.  After all the videos were posted, students received the entire review. screen-shot-2017-01-06-at-7-38-54-pm

Students could use the videos if they had questions when studying. There were multiple videos for each problem, so this also offered students the chance to hear problems explained differently.

I coach cheerleading, and Seesaw has been a great tool. I take videos of chants and routines during practices/games and upload them toscreen-shot-2017-01-06-at-7-39-40-pm Seesaw. We also add formations and notes onto the page for everyone to see and use. Students can also post videos of cheers that they want to learn on the page.

One of the best features is that you can share it with parents. Parents receive a code that allows them to see their child’s work and anything shared to their folder! It’s a great way to engage parents and let them know what’s going on!

Hope you enjoyed my favorite SeeSaw!! If you have any questions feel free to ask!

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#ElonEd Chats Storify

We’ve had some great chats! #ElonEd Chats are open to all educators!

When?

Every other Sunday @ 8:30 PM Est.

Here are all of the archived chats in Storify if you missed them!

 

 

  • 2/12/17 Maximizing Student Teaching
  • 2/26/17 Powerful Lesson Planning
  • 3/12/17 Going Interdisciplinary
  • 3/26/17 Professional Learning Networks
  • 4/9/17 Technology
  • 4/23/17 TBA
  • 5/7/17 TBA
  • 5/21/17 TBA

 

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What Makes Twitter Math Camp so Special? Let Me Tell You…

 

What makes Twitter Math Camp so special? You’re going to a conference that’s referred to as a camp? Wouldn’t more official conferences give you more PD? You’re going to a conference about twitter? One year ago, when Julie Reulbach first told me about TMC, I had no idea what I was getting myself into. Although I had been on Twitter for professional purposes I had NO idea how many math teachers were on Twitter. I definitely didn’t know about #MTBoS.

Over the past year, I started blogging and connecting with other teachers via twitter and started to realize what Julie was talking about. I started making connections with educators who lived all around the world that had the same passions as me. I was tweeting with teachers who were influential in the math education world, but also teachers who were just starting out like me.

I was a little nervous heading all the way to Minnesota to meet a bunch of people who I’ve only interacted with on Twitter. I’ve been hearing about Twitter Math Camp, and I had extremely high expectations. I was afraid that TMC wouldn’t live up to the hype. Let me tell you… it exceeded all of my expectations.

Now, what made TMC different from other math conferences?

AMAZING Sessions

The teachers who attend TMC are teachers who are innovative and extremely involved and committed to changing math education. They are evangelists. All of the presenters are part of the community of #MTBoS. Their presentations are interactive and provide teachers with information and content that they can bring back to apply directly into their teaching.

TMC teachers were also given the opportunity to have a Pre-Conference with Desmos. New features of this amazing calculator are presented to these teachers. These teachers don’t only love new features but love to share what they’ve found.

The Schedule

TMC is organized in a way that allows teachers to truly take the most out of the conference

  • 9:00- 9:30 Morning Opening and My Favorites: My favorites is a time for teachers who did not want to do an hour long session/found something cool to share a chance to share with the entire TMC community for 5-10 minutes. My favorites were accepted through out the week and open to ANYONE at the conference.
  • 9:30 – 11:30 Morning Sessions: On the morning of the first day, you got to choose a morning session that you would attend every morning for three days. I chose “Talk Less, Smile More” Given by Mattie and Chris Luz  (Blog post to come). This 6-hour session inspired me to change the entire design and culture of my classroom. This session provided me enough time to truly learn about debating math in my classroom.   We were also able to work on things to implement into our classes during this session. I loved having a focus for three days.
  • 11:30 – 1:00 pm: Lunch: During lunch, we look over restaurants, and talked casually about our morning sessions. This is also a chance to catch up with people who we’ve only interacted with on Twitter.
  • 1:00- 1:30: AGAIN My Favorites: GIVING MORE TEACHERS A CHANCE TO PRESENT.
  • 1:30- 2:30: Keynote Speaker: Daily motivational presentations that left educators in tears by the end. Have you ever been to a conference where you felt so inspired you cried?
  • 2:45- 3:45: Afternoon Sessions: There were about 12 sessions to choose from every day. These sessions were pre-approved before the conference.
  • 4:00-5:00: Flex Sessions: Flex sessions were an extremely cool idea. During the week many people found a common interest and they wanted to know more about it. Flex sessions were a chance for people who were not approved for the afternoon sessions to present. Anyone could present during the Flex sessions.

THREE whole days of Math!

Although the conference technically ended at 5:00 the learning and bonding didn’t stop. At dinner, drinks, 12 am in our rooms the conversations never stopped. There was never an “end” to the conference. Oh, and I did I mention we all stayed in dorm rooms together? I probably only slept about 5 hours a night…

The Community.

 I honestly don’t know how to describe how amazing the community is at TMC. Everyone is extremely welcoming and willing and eager to share any resources and advice with you. I ‘ve never been to a place where it was perfectly normal to go and stand next to a group of people you’ve never met (or idolized) and they welcome you in with open arms to the conversation. I felt that I was connected with plenty of teachers on Twitter, but now I have an even wider network. I know that I can talk to any of the presenters even though the conference is over.

This conference focuses on building relationships and support within the math community. We all went out to dinner together one night where we took up half the restaurant. We also had a Trivia Night ( my team won btw ) where we broke out in song between every round.

We even created a TMC song where we choreographed dances, wrote lyrics, and played instruments (and Desmos Graphs) to represent our few days at this amazing conference. Truly a camp experience

I’ve learned so much at this conference about teaching, math, and myself. The more I learn; I realize that I know nothing. TMC is a conference where the learning never stops. You don’t dread being in sessions and you feel connected to the speaker. I’m part of a community where I can constantly learn and grow.

See everyone again on July 27-30 in Atlanta. Until then I’ll see you on Twitter. 🙂

 

 

How Yoga has Influenced my Teaching

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To say the least, teaching is exhausting. When I first started in August, I have never been so tired in my entire life. I was climbing into bed before 8 pm! I also started to feel my tension from work in my shoulders, neck, and hips. I typically don’t get stressed, but I could feel the tension taking over my body.

In November, I started taking hot yoga at Yoga One. I’ve practiced yoga a few times before, but my colleagues convinced me to start going with them at 6 am twice a week before heading in for the day. Soon I become a full on yogi practicing every day. My practice became more than a way to exercise but a way of life. Especially within the past month, I have realized how much my practice has affected my teaching.

Getting practice in at 6 am is killer. I am not a morning person, so this only ends up happening once or twice a week. However, when I am able to commit to practice in the morning I start my day energized, positive, and productive.  Starting your day on a good note is SO important for a teacher. I also realized I am more patient with my students when practicing in the morning.

Most days I do not make the 6 am practice and end up going after work. This time on my mat after work has turned some of my worst days completely around. We are taught to breath into the spots of our body where we hold tensionWhen we breathe out, our problems are supposed to go out with it. I know it sounds crazy, but I have learned to direct my breath to places of tension especially my shoulders. No matter how bad the day, I always leave my hour practice feeling better about a situation. This has helped me get rid of anger for a disrespectful student, the feeling of failure for a student I couldn’t help, and anger for a colleague who has views different from mine. The tension in my shoulders, neck and hips are also gone. It’s helped me realize that I shouldn’t take things personally and every day is a new start. It has become my release. 

Learning to breathe has also helped my patience in class. When teaching high schoolers, it is really easy to become frustrated. Once I learned how to control my breathing, I stopped becoming frustrated and created a more welcoming class environment.

Yoga has also helped me inspire and motivate my students. I am constantly listening to my teachers and trying to improve. Yoga teachers are constantly trying to motivate their classes, and a lot of what they say relates to teaching.

“Every practice is a different experience” This holds true in the classroom. No matter how bad the day, the next day is a brand new start. I use this in my teaching, but also to motivate my students. Every day they have a chance to succeed. It’s up to them what experience they take from class.

“Be satisfied with the effort you put in.”   I show up for my students 100% every day. I tell my students that it’s up to them  how much effort they want to exert in class. If they are satisfied with exerting 50% and earning a B then great. They take ownership of their decisions. The teacher can only push them so far and the rest is on them . No one wants to look back on their life and think “Things could have been different if…. ”

Yoga has become a huge benefit in my life. It has helped me find balance. It has helped my focus in work and interactions and has helped me see things through different points of views. It’s crazy how breathing and stretching and exerting energy can have such a positive impact. I highly recommend yoga for any teacher. Since practicing, I have seen a positive change in myself and in my classroom.

 

 

My Twitter Experience

I usually don’t write posts like this, but I am feeling inspired and wanted to blog. 🙂

Tonight, we held the first ever #ElonEd twitter chat (my alma mater Elon University). I was first introduced to the educational use of twitter three years ago by Dr. Jeffery Carpenter. In my class (I think Teaching Diverse Learners? ) we were required to tweet a certain amount per week, tweet at others a certain amount, and participate in twitter chats.

Tonight, we held the first ever #ElonEd twitter chat (my alma mater Elon University). I was first introduced to the educational use of twitter three years ago by Dr. Jeffery Carpenter. In my class (I think Teaching Diverse Learners? ) we were required to tweet a certain amount per week, tweet at others a certain amount, and participate in twitter chats.

At this point in my education, I didn’t have too much to say. I only wanted to interact with my peers when I was on my “educational twitter” and didn’t really explore the magic of a hashtag. Throughout my education at Elon, we continued t0 use Twitter for educational purposes. My “required” class tweets started to become easier and I started to use twitter because I wanted to. It was a REAL resource for me to use daily. When it came to applying for jobs, I even put my twitter handle on my resume. My twitter became part of who I am as a teacher. #MTBoS became my daily hashtag and I identified with strangers who became trusted friends in my profession. I’m even speaking at and attending Twitter Math Camp!

Anyhow, tonight was the first #ElonEd chat. Our focus was on Your First Year in the Classroom. I volunteered “as tribute” to co-moderate the chat with Dr. Scott Morrison. I had never moderated a chat before so I was feeling nervous/excited/anxious waiting for it to start. I had two experiences from participating in this chat

Moderator

Screen Shot 2016-02-23 at 11.33.57 PMBeing a twitter chat moderator is A LOT of work. I applaud all of you. We had around 15 people participate in our first chat. I wanted to respond and retweet and favorite everyone’s tweets! Usually, when I participate in a twitter chat, I don’t get to interact or see everyone’s conversations. This time, I saw EVERYTHING. Even if I was unable to add input, I read everyone’s tweets. It was a great feeling seeing conversations spark from a single question.

Elon Alum

This chat was special to me because I was interacting with past/present/future Elon Alum. The people I was chatting with had the same collegiate upbringing in the world of teaching. No one has the same college experience, but it was cool knowing that we all learned how to be teachers in Mooney. It was also great being able to relate to other teachers and give advice to pre-service teachers and receive advice!

I’ve been parts of twitter chats before, but this one was special. We also had some non-Elon students join which added a different layer to the chat. Honestly, I am looking forward to the next chat.  If you are interested in checking out our next #ElonEd chat join us on 3/8/16 at 9:40 PM. Topic: Technology in the Classroom.

Also check out our last chat on Storify !

As I lay in bed (way past my bedtime) writing this blog post, I’m feeling rejuvenated and ready for a day of teaching tomorrow. For this, I am extremely thankful for Twitter . Twitter allows me to vent, learn, explore, collaborate, and interact. Twitter connects people who have common interests. It gives teachers a way to grow personally and professionally daily.  If you are just starting out on twitter don’t give up on it. It takes a while to build a community, but once you do it can be magical. Tonight, I am thankful for Twitter, #MTBoS and #ElonEd. I am thankful to be a teacher. And I am thankful for being introduced to twitter as an inspired 20-year old motivated to be an amazing teacher.

To sum up this post, I love Twitter… it’s awesome. If you are teacher… USE IT!  On that note, I am heading to bed. Almost midnight on a school night!!!

 

 

 

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My Favorite: Instagram

We are now into Week 2 of the Blogging Initiative, “My Favorite”!  You should definitely check it out if you would like some blogging inspiration!  It is only four posts and it’s not too late to join in.

My favorite for the week is Instagram. Instagram is a social network that many of my students use every day. They use it to post pictures, connect and talk with their friends, and follow bands/celebrities.  The first thing that my students do when they wake up in the morning is check their Instagram. We live in a world where social networks are a part of our everyday lives. Instead of banning it in schools, why not use it to our advantage.

At the beginning of the year, I created a class Instagram. On the first day, I had any student with an Instagram account follow me at Ms.Finneyfrock . I used my Instagram weekly in my classes and in all different ways.

#MathCrushMonday

When students walk in the door on Mondays, my Instagram is up and ready on the SmartBoard with a mathematician as my latest photo and the hashtag #Mathcrushmonday. Students then get on their phones/computers and start lScreen Shot 2016-01-20 at 10.59.33 AMooking up facts about the mathematician on my Instagram. Each student then has to comment a different fact on my picture. I am constantly refreshing my Instagram on the SmartBoard so students can see what is being posted. If students don’t have an Instagram account then they work with another student.

I love #mathcrushmonday because it is a fun and relaxed way to start Monday, and it exposes my students to more than just the curriculum.  5 minutes of class, once a week, allows us to learn about a bunch of mathematicians. Sometimes a real conversation sparks in class when they are researching different mathematicians. I have

Screen Shot 2016-01-20 at 10.57.03 AM4 classes, so I erase the comments from the class before, so all of my students have the same #mathcrushmonday. My schedule changes every day, so each class has had their comments left up at least once. It’s interesting to see how the facts students find vary by class.

Homework Help

Instagram also offers an awesome direct message feature. Students can send me direct messages to ask about homework, due dates, or pictures if thIMG_7045ey take them in class. I have been able to easily help students with their homework. If they get stuck on a problem, I have had students send me a picture of where they got stuck. I am then able to ask them questions  and help them through their assignments. Sending pictures through your phone is much IMG_7046easier than sending a picture through an email and MUCH faster. I also get notifications if a student messages me right away.  I really like direct messaging because it is similar to texting, but my students don’t have my cell phone number. If I don’t want to receive notification for the night or weekend I can just sign off the application.

 

Classwork

I take pictures of my students in class all the time! Whether they are working on a project, going through stations, working with a partner, or just taking notes! I will take a lot of “in the moment” photos, but students love to pose for the pictures. They know that if they are doing their work I will come and take a picture of them. They always want me to put it “on the gram”. I will also take videos of cool activities we do in class! I can also post these on my Instagram. I typically put my school as the location of the photo. This way the school can see everything I post and if anyone is looking at pictures taken at the school they can see our fun class activities! I also told parents about my Instagram. A lot of parents follow my account. By posting about activities we do in class, parents can see and be involved in what’s going on in my class.

Motivation and Reminders

I will use my Instagram to post reminders about due dates and motivate my students to get through the weScreen Shot 2016-01-20 at 10.57.42 AMek. One night had students turning in projects via email and knew a lot of them were stressing about it. I took a picture of the few I already received and posted a Pic Stitch of their work with a caption that said “keScreen Shot 2016-01-20 at 10.58.22 AMep up the great work! These are looking great so far!” I will also post funny memes on days that I can see students are struggling.

 
Personal Connection

I also use my Instagram to show my students that I am more than just a teacher. Over winter break, I posted a picture of the homemade ravioli my family made and in the caption wrote “I hope you all enjoying your time off!” I also used it to wish my students a Merry Christmas (in equation form of course 🙂 ) Instagram also makes you seem more approachable and relational to your students. I also post pictures from community meetings, sporting events, talent shows ext. to involve the entire community. By using Instagram you can seem more approachable and relational to your students.

 

I love using Instagram in and out of my classroom. Students already use this app daily, so why not integrate it into your classroom?! If you have any questions let me know!

#MTBoS A Day in Finneyfrock’s Life!!

Thursday, January 14th

5:00 Alarm goes off

5:05: Check Instagram, snapchat, and facebook

5:15-5:30: Throw on sweats for yoga and pack my school bag

5:30: Off to Yoga

6:00- 7:00: Hot Yoga. Namaste 🙂

7:00-7:20: Getting kinda pretty

7:20: Off to School

7:35: School! Eat my breakfast and drink some coffee while I read through my daily Skimm and Charlotte Agenda emails.

8:05: Meet with my advisory and read the daily blog.

8:20-9:15: A-Block Geometry. Today in class we reviewed for a quiz tomorrow. I created Scavenger Hunt Stations  to practice identifying special quadrilaterals, and finding interior and exterior angles of polygons.  These are the station cards and worksheet that went along with the activity!

9:20-11:10: Planning! I have both of my plannings in the morning. During this time I finished planning for my algebra 1 class and printed quizzes for the next day. I also have a Delta Math assignment due tomorrow, so I had about 6 students coming in and out asking questions (they had drop) during the last 30 minutes of planning.

11:15-12:00: LUNCH!!! Woohooo! The math department shares an office, so we all ate lunch together 🙂

12:05-1:00: Geometry

1:05-2:00: Geometry

2:05-3:00: Algebra 1- We are currently working on scatter plots. Today I introduced coefficient correlations and we played Guess the Correlation all together! I also through together a few other examples not from that site. My students then worked through a Linear Regression Demos Activity about Gray Wolves. My students loved giving the math context. When they all finished, we discuss the activity. I then had them play an AWESOME scatter plot polygraph. Fun class!

3:00-3:30 – Helped students.

3:30-4:30- Teacher yoga! I usually don’t do yoga twice in one day, but I was just feeling it today.

4:30-5:15- Finished up some work to prepare for tomorrow.

5:45- Home for the night!

6:00 Made some perogies for dinner (healthy I know) and put on some Parenthood!

Now I am still watching Parenthood while writing this blog post, and I will probably be heading to sleep soon!

This is part of the Explore MTBoS Blogging Initiative. Please join in!)

Math Goes to the Movies!

 

At my school, the week back after winter break is known as “winterm”. Winterm is a time where teachers can explore their passions by creating and teaching any class they like. Some teachers plan trips for students to go on as well. There are two classes each day. The morning session is from eight til eleven and the afternoon session goes from noon to thurl.jpgree. Teachers also have the option of teaching an all day class. I decided to teach an afternoon class called Math goes to the Movies!

Let me start off by saying that 3 hours is a LONG class to plan for. That’s 15 hours worth of content!! Students don’t receive a grade for their winterm class either so besides intrinsic motivation to learn something new, students have no motivation to be engaged. This class also consisted of students will all different levels of math, so it wScreen Shot 2016-01-07 at 10.17.05 AMas tricky finding material that all students could do.

My original plan for the class was to have students work through Pixar in the Box on Khan Academy the entire time. Pixar in a box is really cool because it explores how animated movies are made using math. However, after the first day I realized how long (and kinda boring) three hours at a computer is!

 

Day two I decided to change it up a bit. I started class by showing clips from tv shows and movies that mentioned math. I showed a clip from the show The Office where Oscar is explaining what a surplus is to Michael. For my baseball fans, I showed a clip from Moneyball and briefly discussed the use of statistics in baseball. Next I showed a clip from Like Mike. This clip looked at different types of triangles in geometry. Lastly I put on the clip from the Wizard of Oz where the Scarecrow incorrectly states the Pythagorean theorem. After we watched the clip by students worked through a worksheet from Mathbits (scroll down the site page for the worksheet)  that deals with triangle inequalities, the Pythagorean theorem and indirect algebraic proof proving the scarecrows theorem to be false.

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Next I had students choose any activity from Pixar in Box to work on with a partner. I found that letting them work with a partner added more discussion about the activity. The last activity of the class was to watch the TV-show Numb3rs.  If you haven’t seen Numb3rs I highly recommend it. It’s a show all about using math to investigate and solve crimes.

Day 3 started out with exploring the New Starwars movie. We did a Desmos Activity that had students make box office predictions for Stars Wars VII: The Force Awakens, based on the first six days of release.IMG_6852

We also did a Race to the Death Star with a prize of candy for 1st 2nd and 3rd place. It’s pretty simple math, but it was a fun way to incorporate math into Starwars.

Next we did Dan Meyer‘s Activity involving the movie the Italian Job. This was a really fun activity dealing with the common misconception of the conversion of feet and inches (ex) that 3 ft and 4 inches is 3.4 feet). I highly recommend checking it out.

Students then worked on another Pixar in the Box and then we watched another episode on Numb3rs (they are really getting into it now!! 🙂 )

On Day 4 had students research a movie/tv-show that included a math topic with a partner. They had to research the following:

  • Why is the topic included in the show?
  • Thorough explanation of the math topic, going beyond the given information in the scene.
  • Any historical background on the topic.
  • What the topic is used for?

At the end of class, they had to give a brief presentation of their findings to the class. I originally got this idea from a pre-calculus project I stumbled upon.

Day 5: We watched A Beautiful Mind. What an awesome movie!  🙂

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Life Size Function Machine!!!!

Functions are always fun to teach in Algebra 1. I’ve seen different function machines used to explain functions and the idea that every input has exactly one output. I LOVED Sarah Hagan’s unit on functions. I used a lot of her worksheets when I taught Math 1 last year. I love that she had an actual function machine that changed the inputs into outputs.  I wanted to create something that was interactive for my very energetic students to help them understand functions. I decided that I wanted to create a life-size function machine for my students to go through. However, we didn’t use the function machine until day 2 of functions!

Day 1 (50 min) 

I created a Peardeck presentation to introduce relations and functions. I started by using the Fryer Model to define a relation. I actually took a picture of my Fryer Model and discussed it, instead of having my students fill it out. On Peardeck, students receive takeaways from the lecture, so my students have my model in their google drive. After discussing relations, I asked my students to give me examples of a relations  using ordered pairs. We then did the same thing for defining a function. Students then gave me examples through peardeck of functions and explained the difference between a function and a relation. We practiced function mapping using x and y coordinates and also inputs and outputs.

Next, we moved into our discussion of domain and range.  I used Sarah’s mnemonic device  DIXROY with my students. DIX: Domain, Inputs, X-Coordinates. ROY: Range, Outputs, Y-Coordinates.  My students found that DIXROY was funny to say, so whenever I would say it they’d all laugh  We will see how well it well help them remember everything though!!

Day 2 (95 min) 

I started day two out with vertical whiteboarding. I have 11 students in my algebra 1 class, and they each got in groups of two or three and stood by the white board. Each group only had one marker. On the board I had a list of ordered pairs. My students had to identify the domain and range of the ordered pairs and state if it were a function or not. Because each group only had one marker, the group had to work together to come up with an answer. It seemed as though most of my students retained the information from the class before.

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Next I introduced function notation. I started by giving my students a function, but writing it as y= 3x +2. Still on their whiteboards, I had students solve for y if x= 2, x= 5, x= 10 ect. I then introduced function notation… first with an example using x and then we used symbols (hearts, smiley faces, apples). After showing a few examples, students worked through the functions using symbols on the whiteboards. It wasn’t until after the symbols that we practiced function notation with numbers.

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My students are extremely rambunctious and sometimes it’s hard to get them to focus. Vertical white boarding keeps them focused and constantly working. I can also see everyone’s work from the middle of the room which is AMAZING. . Thanks for the great idea Anna!!

Now it was finally time to bring out the FUNCTION MACHINE!!!!!! 

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I made my function machine out of a refridgerater box from Lowes and then decorated it! On the top of the machine I had a “function calculator”. I really wanted my students to understand that there is exactly one output for everyone input.  Taped inside the box were blank square green cards and markers. These green cards were the output cards.  I had students break out into their same groups and each group recieved a function. Each group had a chance going through the function machine with their function. When they were going into the machine I gave them a blue “input card” with a number on it. Insde the machine they had to figure out the output and write it on the green card. They left their input card inside the box and brought their output card out with them. I had the other students try and guess what the output would be.

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After every group went through the machine, I gave each group a secret function. I told them that only their group memebers were allowed to see the function. Each group had to come up with inputs and outputs for their functions. They then took turns going through the function machine with inputs and coming out with their outputs. We kept a table of the inputs and outputs on the board. The rest of the class then had to guess the pattern to figure out the function.

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This was a great activity. My students were engaged the entire time and really started to understand functions. Next time, I plan to make the functions into a type of necklace that each student can wear so they feel like they are the actual function. I may also create a worksheet that students can fill in during the activity.

The next day was spent figuring out patterns and function rules using an online function machine. This site was great. Because my students already played around with the life sizse machine the day before, they understood this machine and looking for patterns right away. After working the machine for about 20 minutes, we had a great discussion about finding the function rules.

Overall, this unit has gone pretty well. The life-size function machine was a lot of fun!!! I really liked that my students went in with an input and then had to figure output while inside the machine. Let me know if you have any questions!!! More pictures of the function machine are below!!

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